Hello from Australia
#11
(20/06/2019, 10:08 AM)cbuk2011 Wrote:
(20/06/2019, 01:27 AM)Mike Swanton Wrote: Hi Dino,
I incorrectly called your car a coupe. Your roadster description is more accurate.
We assembled coupe models here in NZ but not the roadster as you present. There were also tourer models.
The pre 1935 14/6 was built on the A model chassis and had a front axle. The post 1934 14/6 was built on the D model chassis and had independent front suspension with the Dubonnet knee action front suspension units. There were many other differences but that is the most easily identified. I believe your roadster is the earlier A model as you describe her, and the unique Australian manufacture will have overseas people scratching their heads when they look at the detail. The mascot however should be the same regardless of country of manufacture, as Colin is referring to.
Tell me, do you have a pedal starter mechanism as opposed to a pull knob on the dash board?
Regards,  Mike

I asked the same question about the starter. However I am informed it has Dubonnet independant front suspension and hence must be a DX model now fitted with an 'A' body, probably to increase its value.

Yes, the front mud guards are of D model design so you might be right Colin.
Is it possible that this is a very late 1934 D model which would fit Dino's description?
If you can quote the engine number Dino we will all be a bit clearer on the cars origin.
As Les says, she looks lovely.
Mike Swanton
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#12
(21/06/2019, 06:22 AM)Mike Swanton Wrote:
(20/06/2019, 10:08 AM)cbuk2011 Wrote:
(20/06/2019, 01:27 AM)Mike Swanton Wrote: Hi Dino,
I incorrectly called your car a coupe. Your roadster description is more accurate.
We assembled coupe models here in NZ but not the roadster as you present. There were also tourer models.
The pre 1935 14/6 was built on the A model chassis and had a front axle. The post 1934 14/6 was built on the D model chassis and had independent front suspension with the Dubonnet knee action front suspension units. There were many other differences but that is the most easily identified. I believe your roadster is the earlier A model as you describe her, and the unique Australian manufacture will have overseas people scratching their heads when they look at the detail. The mascot however should be the same regardless of country of manufacture, as Colin is referring to.
Tell me, do you have a pedal starter mechanism as opposed to a pull knob on the dash board?
Regards,  Mike

I asked the same question about the starter. However I am informed it has Dubonnet independant front suspension and hence must be a DX model now fitted with an 'A' body, probably to increase its value.

Yes, the front mud guards are of D model design so you might be right Colin.
Is it possible that this is a very late 1934 D model which would fit Dino's description?
If you can quote the engine number Dino we will all be a bit clearer on the cars origin.
As Les says, she looks lovely.
Mike Swanton



No ……….. it looks like a "bug" ….
Look at top of front mud guards …..
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#13
Re post 11; the front wings are NOT D type. Note 1. the large joint panel below the rad shell 2. the rear lower part of the wheel arch opening is rounded, Ds are not 3. the fixing holes are not as the D wings.

Still looking forward to seeing the ident plate.
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#14
(22/06/2019, 08:54 AM)Chris Knapman Wrote: Re post 11; the front wings are NOT D type. Note 1. the large joint panel below the rad shell 2. the rear lower part of the wheel arch opening  is rounded, Ds are not 3. the fixing holes are not as the D wings.

Still looking forward to seeing the ident plate.

Hi Chris,
Good points.
But as the front of the guards is cut low to the bumper as per the D design, rather than more deeply scalloped as per the A design, and given the creative design options used by Holdens, I lean to modified D front mud guards rather than modified A mud guards. 
As you say we need to find out the identity details to resolve this issue and all the other questions about the design variations.
Mike
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#15
Hi Mike,
I think Dino's car has the second, more deeply skirted wings of the two types fitted to the A: it also looks as though that the A wings are more 'domed' than the D thus the two front fixings are on a near vertical part of the wing.
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#16
Hi all, looks to me like a standard Holden bodied early (1935) DX roadster.

Leigh.
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#17
Sorry, that should have been DASX - not DX.

In Australia Holdens marketed a model called a DASX. These, I believe, were a mash up of left over ASX body bits fitted to early DX chassis.

A chassis number or a picture of the ID plate might confirm this??????


Leigh.
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#18
At last, what appears to solve the puzzle!
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#19
Perhaps I spoke too soon!

On the back page of the May 2019 Flutenews there are a couple of photographs of this 'DASX' sent in by George Seymour when the car was to be auctioned by Shannons. One shows a front three-quarter view taken low enough to see what I believe to be a front axle beam.

Any comments?
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