Hello from Australia
#1
Hi All

Hello from Australia. I live in Horsham, about halfway between Melbourne and Adelaide. I've recently purchased a 1934 ASX Roadster that is very close to being back on the road. My understanding is the chassis and running gear was built in Luton and exported. The body was built in Melbourne and is apparently 1 of 19 roadsters. There were also sedans and coupes produced.

[Image: Img_7137.jpg]

I am also the treasurer of the Wimmera Mallee Historical Vehicle Society which has about 160 members with many marques represented. Not very many Vauxhall.

Happy motoring

Dino.
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#2
(15/06/2019, 08:02 AM)Dino-ASX Wrote: Hi All

Hello from Australia. I live in Horsham, about halfway between Melbourne and Adelaide. I've recently purchased a 1934 ASX Roadster that is very close to being back on the road. My understanding is the chassis and running gear was built in Luton and exported. The body was built in Melbourne and is apparently 1 of 19 roadsters. There were also sedans and coupes produced.

[Image: Img_7137.jpg]

I am also the treasurer of the Wimmera Mallee Historical Vehicle Society which has about 160 members with many marques represented. Not very many Vauxhall.

Happy motoring

Dino.
A  DX - Model A  Hybrid with a Chevy windscreen 9 Not unusual on Australian cars - Incorrect side lamps and Mascot
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#3
Hi Dino,
She looks lovely. As you will appreciate the Holden bodied Vauxhalls are different to the Luton (UK), or Petone (NZ), bodied Vauxhalls. They have unique features that involve alternative GM parts. I have mainly Petone and Luton Vauxhalls but my sole Holdens bodied Vauxhall also has the unique fingerprint of Australian manufacture.
I guess everyone is aware of the "Local Content" legislation in Australia and, to a lesser extent, in New Zealand that drove this unique development in the 30's and 40's in particular. Your Australian local content law was so tough that Holden could generally only import the rolling chassis from Luton whereas we in NZ could also import the Luton body panels as well, meeting our local content through assembly, upholstery, etc.
In the case of your coupe the body was also imported but things like windscreen, lights, etc were locally obtained from GM subcontractors in Australia. Here in NZ we assembled a few coupes as well but we kept to the Luton specifications.
With my 1937 Holdens GY I found that the "Turret Top" all steel body was the body GM adopted for the Chevrolet in the USA in 1939. So your Australian experiments in body design were more than local quirks, much more, even developing GM design features that were adopted by GM in other countries.
Regards, Mike
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#4
Hi Mike and Cbuk, thank you for the comments. I have to say that I'm really only calling it an ASX as that is how it was described to me at purchase. If left to my own devices, I would probably just call it a 14/6 like a sedan we once had. I did really buy the roadster on a bit of a whim. I had actually been looking for a 1934 Ford Roadster when I noticed this one for sale in a Shannons auction (http://www.shannons.com.au). I remembered that when I was a teenager (1980s), my dad restored a 14/6 sedan. The sedan was being driven to my Grandfathers farm to have the roof cut off as a spotlighting vehicle but they seized the engine on the way there and that probably saved the car which sat in an old school house for 20 years before the restoration. At that time, I found a 1936 roadster 14/6 and bought it for $50 as it was rusting away under a peppercorn tree. Dad stripped it for the front end, wheels and diff for his car and I thought I would street rod the roadster one day. Cut to a few weeks later and the roadster was gone when I got home from school. I asked dad where it was and he said "Sold it for $500". I asked why he sold it when it was mine and he said it was too good an offer. I asked him where my $500 was and he responded "That'd gone too". When I saw this one for sale, I thought it was too good an opportunity to miss. Although I did go over my limit in the auction.
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#5
Hi Colin, on another subject, you mentioned my mascot. Would you have a picture of an original one and I will keep an eye out. I do quite like this one though. My own naked lady to take with me everywhere, lol.
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#6
(17/06/2019, 01:08 AM)Dino-ASX Wrote: Hi Colin, on another subject, you mentioned my mascot. Would you have a picture of an original one and I will keep an eye out. I do quite like this one though. My own naked lady to take with me everywhere, lol.

I have an original 'A' series maskot on one of my Dx's will post a picture for you
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#7
(17/06/2019, 01:08 AM)Dino-ASX Wrote: Hi Colin, on another subject, you mentioned my mascot. Would you have a picture of an original one and I will keep an eye out. I do quite like this one though. My own naked lady to take with me everywhere, lol.

Done abit of research and I think your mascot has been taken from a Packard
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#8
Hi Dino,
I incorrectly called your car a coupe. Your roadster description is more accurate.
We assembled coupe models here in NZ but not the roadster as you present. There were also tourer models.
The pre 1935 14/6 was built on the A model chassis and had a front axle. The post 1934 14/6 was built on the D model chassis and had independent front suspension with the Dubonnet knee action front suspension units. There were many other differences but that is the most easily identified. I believe your roadster is the earlier A model as you describe her, and the unique Australian manufacture will have overseas people scratching their heads when they look at the detail. The mascot however should be the same regardless of country of manufacture, as Colin is referring to.
Tell me, do you have a pedal starter mechanism as opposed to a pull knob on the dash board?
Regards, Mike
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#9
(20/06/2019, 01:27 AM)Mike Swanton Wrote: Hi Dino,
I incorrectly called your car a coupe. Your roadster description is more accurate.
We assembled coupe models here in NZ but not the roadster as you present. There were also tourer models.
The pre 1935 14/6 was built on the A model chassis and had a front axle. The post 1934 14/6 was built on the D model chassis and had independent front suspension with the Dubonnet knee action front suspension units. There were many other differences but that is the most easily identified. I believe your roadster is the earlier A model as you describe her, and the unique Australian manufacture will have overseas people scratching their heads when they look at the detail. The mascot however should be the same regardless of country of manufacture, as Colin is referring to.
Tell me, do you have a pedal starter mechanism as opposed to a pull knob on the dash board?
Regards,  Mike

I asked the same question about the starter. However I am informed it has Dubonnet indipendant front suspension and hence must be a DX model now fitted with an 'A' body, probably to increase its value.
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#10
Hi Deno,
Whatever it is, it has an interesting history, love it. Welcome to the forum.
Les
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