1937 DX progress
#1
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Hello all,

This time a year ago, I eased my DX out of the garage to run into town on some errands, and magically couldn’t get her to move once I was ready to pull onto the road. After much trial and error, I found that there was absolutely no power going to the rear driver’s side wheel. The axle shaft had sheared.

I opened the rear diff, and the spindles look good, and there are no metal shavings in the housing fortunately. Through a year of searching and pure dumb luck I caught the attention of member George south of Sydney Australia, who happily sold me a set of spare axles he had in his shed, and shipped them off to me in the US. The car happily still runs well after sitting for nearly a year (aside from a leaky petrol pump that I’ll need to source spares to fix), so now I’m hopefully on the tail end of the journey of getting her back on the road. I will still need to find a replacement oil seal for the hub, and a new gasket for the the differential.

I’ll keep posting as I make progress, but any insight would be appreciated!

Cheers,
Charles
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#2
Hello Charles,

Nice to read your post and sorry to hear of the sheared shaft. The only reason I can think of for one to shear like that would be if a hub nut were significantly over tightened, as I've seen that on modern front wheel drive cars. Still, you have the parts now so all being well, the old car will be good again.

As for the fuel pump, there are often repair kits on eBay and if yours is like the one used on the H-Type (as I used to own), the sealing is mainly done by the diaphragm itself if the leak is from the mating flange where the two halves are screwed together, but probably more likely it could be perished rubber hose?

Take care.

Ian.
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#3
(09/06/2018, 09:38 PM)Ian Till Wrote: Hello Charles,

Nice to read your post and sorry to hear of the sheared shaft.  The only reason I can think of for one to shear like that would be if a hub nut were significantly over tightened, as I've seen that on modern front wheel drive cars.  Still, you have the parts now so all being well, the old car will be good again.

As for the fuel pump, there are often repair kits on eBay and if yours is like the one used on the H-Type (as I used to own), the sealing is mainly done by the diaphragm itself if the leak is from the mating flange where the two halves are screwed together, but probably more likely it could be perished rubber hose?

Take care.

Ian.

Thank you Ian!
I’m not sure what to make of the axle, it literally rolled all of 20 feet downhill in 1st gear when it happened. Fortunately I have some experts from the local car museum that I volunteer at that will help me get the old one out, and set the new one in.

Today, I had her running at a low idle just to pay attention to the pump, and it appears it’s leaking from the diaphragm as you guessed. It’s a type T, and I wrote to someone in NY that specializes in rebuilding petrol pumps- we’ll see. I do have a spare type T for an Austin 7 I’ve been working on, but it’s backwards and the actuators arm is too long for the engine.
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#4
Not being an expert, I'm not sure what your fuel pump looks like, but for many years, Vauxhall like many other manufacturers used AC pumps and so, while there were many different mountings and actuator arms, the internal parts were pretty interchangeable. I bought a neoprene diaphragm repair kit and found that it had all the bits I needed to recondition my pump. It came with the mesh strainers, several gaskets and a few other bits that were alien to my pump. I suspect that the diaphragm is common to pretty much all and the other bits varied over the years.

Your diaphragm is probably made of leather, when you do replace it, I remember there being a need to part deform it before nipping up the clamping screws as otherwise it would be too tight to pump enough volume. I found the valves were easy to polish as they were seated against slightly dusty looking metal; all I did was clean everything and put it back together with the new diaphragm.

Good luck. :-)

Ian.
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#5
(10/06/2018, 06:47 AM)Ian Till Wrote: Not being an expert, I'm not sure what your fuel pump looks like, but for many years, Vauxhall like many other manufacturers used AC pumps and so, while there were many different mountings and actuator arms, the internal parts were pretty interchangeable.  I bought a neoprene diaphragm repair kit and found that it had all the bits I needed to recondition my pump.  It came with the mesh strainers, several gaskets and a few other bits that were alien to my pump.  I suspect that the diaphragm is common to pretty much all and the other bits varied over the years.

Your diaphragm is probably made of leather, when you do replace it, I remember there being a need to part deform it before nipping up the clamping screws as otherwise it would be too tight to pump enough volume.  I found the valves were easy to polish as they were seated against slightly dusty looking metal; all I did was clean everything and put it back together with the new diaphragm.

Good luck. :-)

Ian.
An easy fix is to fit an electric 'Facet' pump in the line. They are readily available on 'Ebay' at around £20 and work very well.
AC fuel repair kits are readily available and it is almost certainly the diaghram which has perished with time..
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#6
(10/06/2018, 09:50 AM)cbuk2011 Wrote:
(10/06/2018, 06:47 AM)Ian Till Wrote: Not being an expert, I'm not sure what your fuel pump looks like, but for many years, Vauxhall like many other manufacturers used AC pumps and so, while there were many different mountings and actuator arms, the internal parts were pretty interchangeable.  I bought a neoprene diaphragm repair kit and found that it had all the bits I needed to recondition my pump.  It came with the mesh strainers, several gaskets and a few other bits that were alien to my pump.  I suspect that the diaphragm is common to pretty much all and the other bits varied over the years.

Your diaphragm is probably made of leather, when you do replace it, I remember there being a need to part deform it before nipping up the clamping screws as otherwise it would be too tight to pump enough volume.  I found the valves were easy to polish as they were seated against slightly dusty looking metal; all I did was clean everything and put it back together with the new diaphragm.

Good luck. :-)

Ian.
An easy fix is to fit an electric 'Facet' pump in the line. They are readily available on 'Ebay' at around £20 and work very well.
AC fuel repair kits are readily available and it is almost certainly the diaghram which has perished with time..

Thank you! I had a quick poke around, and facet pumps are really commonly available here. I think I’ll go that route for now, and recondition the pump properly once I’m able to find the proper spares. The AC T type was never used on American cars to my knowledge, and the facet pump would take care of vapour lock for me too.
One question though- how do they actually work? It seems to be a straight forward electrical connection, so is it just a steady pressure as opposed to being governed by the engine RPM?
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#7
(10/06/2018, 07:51 PM)lostsignal Wrote: [quote pid='5546' dateline='1528624238']
Thank you! I had a quick poke around, and facet pumps are really commonly available here. I think I’ll go that route for now, and recondition the pump properly once I’m able to find the proper spares. The AC T type was never used on American cars to my knowledge, and the facet pump would take care of vapour lock for me too.
One question though- how do they actually work? It seems to be a straight forward electrical connection, so is it just a steady pressure as opposed to being governed by the engine RPM?

Charles,
I have fitted the facet type pumps to quite a few old cars.
It saves a lot of starter motor work as you can have the fuel ready in the carburettor within seconds.
I usually fit the pump somewhere near the tank via an in line filter.
Electrical connection is from the ignition switch with an in line fuse (check with supplier for fuse rating).
The feed line can go via the original fuel pump (you will have to seal the diaphragm) so it will look original.

When you purchase the pump seek advice as to the pressure rating by stating the carburettor type and float needle valve size.
Your type and sizes are (depending on Chassis number): Zenith 30VM or 30VIG Carb, with 1.5 or 1.75 mm needle valves.
Regards.
Chas.

A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. A optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty.
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#8
(11/06/2018, 08:52 AM)Chas Wrote:
(10/06/2018, 07:51 PM)lostsignal Wrote: [quote pid='5546' dateline='1528624238']
Thank you! I had a quick poke around, and facet pumps are really commonly available here. I think I’ll go that route for now, and recondition the pump properly once I’m able to find the proper spares. The AC T type was never used on American cars to my knowledge, and the facet pump would take care of vapour lock for me too.
One question though- how do they actually work? It seems to be a straight forward electrical connection, so is it just a steady pressure as opposed to being governed by the engine RPM?
The pumps do not produce any high pressure, so you shouldn;t have any problems. It will be obvious though at the carb if you are having problems as the bowl will start to overflow. Some of the more expensive Facet pumps have settings for engine size.
Charles,
[/quote]
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#9
People might think that I'm out of my tree, but I don't want my old Vauxhall to fire on the first pull of the starter. I'd rather that the engine was cranked over a few times to build up oil pressure, to check that the clutch and pressure plate aren't frozen, and generally to get things moving gently before the engine fires and the revs rapidly increase. So I'm not keen on additional, or better, fuel pumps.
Mike
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#10
Well, the spare axle has arrived courtesy George in Sydney AU, and I managed to pick up a hub extractor to get to work.

The axle had sheared right at the splines in the rear differential.

Sadly, this has me at a complete impasse:  I can't seem to move the splines from the differential more than a half a centimeter or so.  Does anyone have any tricks?  I really don't want to take the entire differential and drive train apart if I can avoid it.  I have no replacement oil seals or gaskets (and sourcing them has been impossible.)

Attached are a few pics:  The first being a comparison of the broken axle next to a replacement.  The second is the rear diff, where you can just make out the tip of the splines.

Cheers,
Charles


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