Rad Repair.
#1
As you all know this type of radiator can cost the earth to re-core or make a new shell.
This as a less costly way of getting around a repair to lower tank on customers radiator.

Finding problems. Pictures show repairs carried out over a number of years and results after stripping.
       
LH and RH securing points repair plates cut and shaped to size. Bottom hose assembly replaced.
       

Final repair before testing and fettling.
   

Had more pictures but only allowed five attachments in any one post.
Regards.
Chas.

A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. A optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty.
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#2
Isn't there still a casual water trap in the lower shell of the radiator that will cause later corrosion?
Mike
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#3
(03/12/2017, 07:18 PM)Mike Swanton Wrote: Isn't there still a casual water trap in the lower shell of the radiator that will cause later corrosion?
Mike

Mike,
Not sure what you mean by a 'casual' water trap.
As you can see in the last picture, all parts are of brass, except the inlet hose fitting in stainless steel.
The original steel studs are the only corrosion points left, these together with internal plates, have been covered in solder.
Regards.
Chas.

A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. A optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty.
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#4
I think all the crud in the first photo gives the impression that the bottom tank is corroded. Photo 2 clearly shows the tank is brass.
Never heard of a 'casual' water trap!
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#5
The only "casual water trap" I can think of was kept under the bed in the good old days !! Angry
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#6
(04/12/2017, 10:48 AM)DaveD Wrote: The only "casual water trap" I can think of was kept under the bed in the good old days !! Angry

Often termed a 'Guzunder'
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#7
(04/12/2017, 05:13 PM)cbuk2011 Wrote:
(04/12/2017, 10:48 AM)DaveD Wrote: The only "casual water trap" I can think of was kept under the bed in the good old days !! Angry

Often termed a 'Guzunder'

That's Brummy, init?
Regards.
Chas.

A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. A optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty.
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#8
Nice. There's nothing you can't do, is there Chas?
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#9
(04/12/2017, 06:54 AM)Chas Wrote:
(03/12/2017, 07:18 PM)Mike Swanton Wrote: Isn't there still a casual water trap in the lower shell of the radiator that will cause later corrosion?
Mike

Mike,
Not sure what you mean by a 'casual' water trap.
As you can see in the last picture, all parts are of brass, except the inlet hose fitting in stainless steel.
The original steel studs are the only corrosion points left, these together with internal plates, have been covered in solder.

Hi Chas,
What I've found with my Vauxhalls, and it may be different with English assembled models, is that there are too many opportunities for dampness to be trapped between the brass radiator and the steel surround, or around the bottom of the grill assembly. They are what I refer to as casual water traps. Yes the pipe inlets and outlets corroded as well, but that's not what concerns me here.
The lower grill / radiator assemblies of many Vauxhalls has rusted away because of this. There is the usual trap on the lowest point of the GY grill assembly; most of that assembly has long since disintegrated. The radiator surround suffers, as do the bolt assemblies under the radiator that you show. I agree that soldering those steel parts may delay corrosion but it may trap moisture and speed up corrosion too. 
I don't have a good answer but it is surprising that better aeration around the water sources and around the lower steel body parts wasn't a key part of the original design. If the radiator was kept clear of the steel surround and air allowed to flow past then little corrosion occured except at the bottom. But so many were installed with fancy piping that helped impede air flow.
Rotting sills are just taken for granted. And when bung holes in the body were provided users closed them off because of dust and road grime and they remained sealed, like in the boots of post war Vauxhalls where rust became rampant. 
We never came to a user friendly design to solve the problem of water meeting steel.
Mike
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#10
Ah, now I under stand the 'casual water trap' you mention.

The radiator shown does not suffer from you description/steel surround as it is mounted directly to the chassis on rubber suspension pads.

The radiators with the steel surround, as you say, are subject to corrosion due to deterioration of paint/sealing surfaces and lack of drain holes (in lower frame channel), plus in many cases incorrect fitting/s.
Regards.
Chas.

A pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. A optimist sees opportunity in every difficulty.
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